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Academic Units

Course Syllabi

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 1

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3

Objective: To provide the students of economics, business, finance with the basic principles, laws and concepts of economics. This course helps build a background for the students who should later master deeper fields of economics such as macroeconomics, microeconomics, growth, international economics and others. To provide the students of other fields who will not continue studies on economics, with general, basic insights into economics.

Prerequisite by Topic: none

Contents: Introduction and basic concepts in economics: the subject matter, tools, methods of economics, demand and supply; Introduction to Macroeconomics: National income concepts and accounting, business cycles and economic ailments, determination of national income, aggregate demand and aggregate supply approaches.

Recommended Reading :

Campbell R. McConnell and Stanley L. Brue (1999). Economics, Principles, Problems, and Policies. Irwin and McGraw-Hill, Boston .

Roger LeRoy Miller (2000). Economics Today, Addison-Wesley , Massachusetts

Teaching Methods: Lecture/classroom discussions

Assessment Tools: Quizzes, midterm exam, final exam.

Instruction Language: English

 

MA 121 MATHEMATICS I

Type of Course: Lecture + Associated Classes

Year: 1

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3

Objective: This course provide the mathematical basis for students of management, economics and          international finance by introducing them with the most important mathematical tools and methods that are needed in business, economics and international finance context.

Contents: An overview of Radicals, Exponents and Basic Matematical Formulas; Polinomy; Logarithms; Set theory: Intervals, Absolute value, Boole algebra, Morgan rule; Probability; Functions; Series; Mathematics of finance: Compound interest, Present Value, Future value; Slope and Equations of lines; Rules for differentiation; Elasticity; Limit; Graphs of functions

Recommended Reading:

Ernest F. Haeussler, Jr. and Richard S. Paul (1999). Introductory Mathematical Analysis, 9th ed., Prentice-Hall, London

Teaching Methods:

Projects/Teamwork: Students form a team ( 3-4 students per team). Teams of students will prove the mathematical formulas that is given by the instructor. The performance of the students is measured by their researches and presentations.

Assesment tools: Homeworks, Attendance, One midterm exam, Final exam

Instruction Language: English

 

BA 101 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 1

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3

Objective And Contents:
Helping students to understand the firm as sub-system of a broader socio-economic and political supra-system. The firm will be handled as a three dimensional cube : managerial functions (planning, organization, direction, controlling and auditing) and organizational functions (finance and accounting, marketing and sales, production, human resources, purchasing and supply, R&D, PR, IT etc.) and five M’s (money, materials, man, methodology, machine and equipment) as inputs. The course will be executed in a format which can be defined as “maximum interactivity based on discussions in class, plus full integration of theory and real life cases”.
* Managing Within the Dynamic Business Environment – Taking Risks and Making Profits. 
* How Economics Affects Business: The Creation and Distribution of Wealth 
* Competing in Global Markets 
* Demonstrating Ethical Behavior and Social Responsibility 
* Choosing a Form of Business Ownership 
* Entrepreneurship and Starting a Small Business 
* Management, Leadership, and Employee Empowerment 
* Adapting Organizations to Today’s Markets 
* Producing World-Class Goods and Services 
* Motivating Employees and Building Self-Managed Teams 
* Human Resource Management: Finding and Keeping the Best Employees 
* Dealing with Employee-Management Issues and Relationships 
* Marketing: Building Customer and Stakeholder Relationships 
* Developing and Pricing Products and Services 
* Distributing Products Quickly and Efficiently 
* Today’s Promotional Techniques 
* Using Technology to Manage Information 
* Understanding Financial Information and Accounting 
* Financial Management 
* Securities Markets: Financing and Investing Opportunities 
* Understanding Money and Financial Institutions 
* Managing Personal Finances to Achieve Financial Security and Managing Risk 

Prerequisite(s) by topic :

Business Management with the Managerial and Organizational Functions

The textbook :

Understanding Business, W.G.Nickels et al., 7th edition, McGraw Hill, 2005.

Other references :

Also a list of articles for each topic is given to students in each class. 

Teaching methods:


Computer usage : The students will be able to study and solve the problems given in textbook’s CD as well as website of the author. Also in the visa project process, students will use internet for research because of not being able to find a lot of published reference on the brand new topic.


Projects /Teamwork: A Mid-term project for each student as visa will be given by instructor on a topic which will be chosen as a brand new issue. The topic will be defended at visa exam hour orally, also submitting a written copy of totally ten pages, at least including three pages of theoretical study and seven pages of practical study for a real company which the student will study on it physically or virtually through internet. A references page and related figures, graphs and images should also be included besides those ten pages. 

Assesment Tools:
one term project; one final exam

Instruction Language:
English

 

EL 101 ENGLISH I

Type of Course: Lecture and Workshop

Year: 1

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3

Objective
:

To increase students’s efficiency in their academic work by teaching the necessary skills required for successful academic study.

To develop students proficiency in spoken English and equipping them with the specific terminology of their chosen field of study.

Contents:

Students to acquire and develop skills in the following areas.

Writing

Reading

Communication

Study Skills

Recommended Reading :

A wide range of daily newspapers;

Periodicals, eg: The Economist;

Newsweek; Time.

Student’s own course book.

Weekly prepared materials on current issues.

A Thesaurus.

Teaching Methods:

Lecture , Workshops, Seminairs, Interactive Student activities, Debates/Discussions on current issues

Presentation/Oral Practice Student projects and research.

Assessment tools:

Two mid term examinations, one final examination end of term Oral Assessment Continuous Assessment for coursework and participation.

Instruction Language:

English

 

BA 131 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS


Type of Course: Laboratory

Year: 1

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3

Objective And Contents: The aim of this course is to introduce the fundamentals of personal computers, introduction to Windows environment and use applications. You’ll become familiar with the terminology and concept of Windows. The next step in this course is to introduce the basic concepts of word processing using Microsoft Word for Windows and to create web pages. Introduction to Microsoft Windows; Windows basics, Mouse Operations, Arranging Windows, Using Floppy Disks, hands on exercise on Paint and WordPad; Saving a file on a hard disk, Managing your files and folders on your floppy and hard disk,   
Introduction to Microsoft Word; Basic of word processing, Introduction to Word screen, Entering and editing text, Opening, Saving and Closing a document, Printing a document, Print Manager, Formatting paragraphs, Bulleted list, Numbering Tables; Creating tables,Inserting and deleting row/column, Insert Image,Replying and Forwarding e-mails

Recommended Reading:
Microsoft Office XP Standard for Students and Teachers
Redmond, Wash; Microsoft Office 97 Professional step by step, Microsoft Press, 1997.

Teaching Methods:

Computer usage,The student will use MicroSoft Office Package.

Assesment Tools:
Midterm exam , Final exam

Instruction Language:
English

 

AT 211 PRINCIPLES OF ATATURK AND HISTORY OF TURKISH REPUBLIC I

Type of Course: Lecture

Year:1

Semester: Fall

Credits:

Objective and Contents:
Informing the students about our recent history. Important events and developments between Tanzimat and the establishment of Turkish Republic is also a fundamental part of the course. Principles of Ataturk is another topic, which will be discussed in detail.

Textbook/Recommended Reading :
Türk Devrim Tarihi, Toktamış Ateş, Der Yayınları, 1993

Teaching Methods: Lecture, class discussions

Assessment tools: Midterm exams, final exam

Instruction Language: Turkish

 

EC 122 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS II

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 1

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3

Objective: To provide the students of economics, business, and finance with the basic principles, laws and concepts of economics. This course helps build a background for the students who should later master deeper fields of economics such as macroeconomics, microeconomics, growth, international economics and others. To provide the students of other fields who will not continue studies on economics, with general, basic insights into economics.

Prerequisite by Topic: Introductory knowledge in economics

Contents: Introduction to microeconomics; The consumer behavior and equilibrium; The theory of production and of costs; The market models; The goods markets: The perfect competition, monopoly, oligopoly, monopolistic competition. The factor markets: land, labor, capital.

Recommended Reading :

Campbell R. McConnell and Stanley L. Brue (1999). Economics, Principles, Problems, and Policies. Irwin and McGraw-Hill, Boston

Roger LeRoy Miller (2000). Economics Today, Addison-Wesley , Massachusetts .

Teaching Methods: Lecture/class discussions

Assessment Tools: Quizzes, midterm exam, final exam

Instruction Language: English

 

MA 122 MATHEMATICS II

Type of Course: Lecture + Associated Classes

Year: 1

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3

Objective: The purpose of this course is giving the mathematical techniques, formulas and methods to students in order to support in solving economic, business and financial problems.

Prerequisite by Topic: Derivatives; Limits; Absolute value

Contents: An overview of Mathematics 1 topics; Multivariable Funtions: Partial Derivatives, Maxima and Minima for functions of multivariables, Lagrange Multipliers, optimization of multivariable functions; Taylor and Maclauren Series; Character analysis of series, divergent and convergent series, Matrix Algebra: Matrices, Matrix Multiplication, Inverses, Determinants, Cramer’s rule

Recommended Reading:

Ernest F. Haeussler, Jr. and Richard S. Paul (1999). Introductory Mathematical Analysis, 9th ed., Prentice-Hall, London

Teaching Methods:

Projects/Teamwork: Students form a team ( 3-4 students per team ). Teams of students will prove the mathematical formulas that is given by the instructor. The performance of the students is measured by their researches and presentations.

Assesment tools: Homeworks, Attendance, One midterm exam, Final exam

Instruction Language: English

 

BA 106 INTRODUCTION TO LAW

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 1

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3

Objective And Contents: The broad objective of this course is to enable students to respond sensibly to the impact of law on daily life. In addition, this course aims to enhance knowledge and understanding of law and society, learn the meanings of common legal terms, locate and cite legal information, and develop an understanding of the fundamentals of Turkish Law. What is law; the Development of law; the Categories of law; how laws are made; the Court system, Criminal Law; Family Law; Environmental Law; International Law.


Recommended Reading :

Seref Gözübüyük (1997). Introduction to Fundamental Concepts of Law. Turan, Ankara .

Teaching Methods:
Classroom Discussion

Assessment Tools: One Midterm and Final exam.

Instruction Language: English and Turkish

 

EL 102 ENGLISH II

Type of Course: Lecture and Workshop

Year: 1

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3

Objective:

To increase students’s efficiency in their academic work by teaching the necessary skills required for successful academic study.

To develop students proficiency in spoken English and equipping them with the specific terminology of their chosen field of study.

 

Contents:

Students to acquire and develop skills in the following areas.

Writing

Reading

Communication

Study Skills

 

Recommended Reading :

A wide range of daily newspapers;

Periodicals, eg: The Economist;

Newsweek; Time.

Student’s own course book.

Weekly prepared materials on current issues.

A Thesaurus.

 

Teaching Methods:

Lecture , Workshops, Seminairs, Interactive Student activities, Debates/Discussions on current issues

Presentation/Oral Practice Student projects and research.

Assessment tools:

Two mid term examinations, one final examination end of term Oral Assessment Continuous Assessment for coursework and participation.

Instruction Language:

English

 

BA 104 / INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTING

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 1

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3

Objective: Teaching accounting to students as an art, science and practice concerned with a systematic identifying, collecting, recording, classifying and summarizing in a significant manner and in terms of money, exchange transactions or equivalent economic events of a financial character and interpreting and reporting the results.

Contents: Definition of accounting, functions of accounting, basic accounting concepts, generally accepted  accounting principles, basic financial statements, accounting books and documents, the accounts, recording and posting, trial balance, end-of-year adjustments, adjusted trial balance, preparing basic financial statements, uniform accounting system

Recommended Reading:

Charles T.Horngren, W.T.Harrison, L.S.Bamber, Accounting, Prentice-Hall International, Inc.  USA

Kizil, Ahmet, Accounting and Tax Applications, Der Yayınları, Istanbul

Teaching Methods: Classroom Discussion

Assesment tools: Homeworks, two midterm exams, final exam.

Instruction Language: English

 

AT 212 PRINCIPLES OF ATATURK AND HISTORY OF TURKISH REPUBLIC II

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 1

Semester: Spring

Credits: 2

Objective and Contents: Informing students about our recent history is one of the leading objectives of this course. Istiklal Savasi and various reforms realized after the establishment of Turkish Republic will also be discussed. 

Textbook/Recommended Reading :
Türk Devrim Tarihi, Toktamış Ateş, Der Yayınları, 1993.

Teaching Methods: Lecture, class discussions

Assessment tools: Midterm exams, final exam

Instruction Language: Turkish

 

SC-201 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 2

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3

Objective and Contents:
Introduction to Statistics includes descriptive statistics which focuses on developing graphical and numerical summaries and partial inferential statistics which uses these numerical summaries to assist in decision making. Introduction to statistics, fundamental elements of statistics, types of data, collecting data, reliability and validity of data. Measures of central tendency: Arithmetic, geometric and squared mean for grouped and ungrouped data, median and mode for grouped and ungrouped data, properties of measures of central tendency, selecting of measure of central tendency. Measures of dispersion: The variance, the standard deviation, the coefficient of variation.  Index numbers, fixed base and link relatives index numbers, relations between fixed base and link relatives index numbers, determination of weights, composite index numbers, Laspeyres price index numbers, Paasche price index numbers, Fischer price index numbers , specific use of index numbers ( rotate to real prices from current prices). Probability: Concepts of events, sample spaces and probability, unions and intersections, complementary events, conditional probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, random variable, probability distribution expected value, The Binominal probability distribution, Hypergeometric distribution, Poisson distribution, The Normal distribution, standard normal distribution.

Textbook/Recommended Reading
Statistics, J.T. McClave and T. Sincich, 8th. Ed., Prentice Hall, 2000.

Teaching Methods: Classroom discussion

Assessment tools: Midterm exam, Final exam

Instruction Language: English

 

BA 211 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING

 

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 2

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3

Objective: To provide a solid understanding of the Valuation Methods, Valuation of Assets and Liabilities, Adjusting prosses, Adjusting the accounts, Recording the adjusting entries, Account of Tax, Uniform Turkish Accounting System. To prepare the student as an Asistant of Accountant

 

Prerequisite by Topic: None

 

Contents: Income Statement and Adjusting Entries, Adjusting  prosses, Adjusting the Accounts, Inventory Systems, Inventory Costing Methods, FIFO,LIFO, Weighted-Average Cost, Accounting for Plant Assets, Intengible Assets and related Expenses, Prepaid Expenses, Depreciations, Accrued Expenses,  Accrued Revenues, The Adjusted Trial Balance, Preparing the Financial Statements from the Adjusted Trial balance, Completing the Accounting Cycle, Recording the Adjusting Entries, Closing the Accounts, Postclosing Trial Balance, Uniform Accounting System

 

Recommended Reading:

 

Charles T.Horngren, W.T.Harrison and L.S.Bamber (2001). Accounting, Prentice-Hall International, Inc.  USA

 

Ahmet Kızıl (2006), Accounting and Tax Applications, Bahar  Yayınevi, Istanbul

 

Teaching Methods: Lecture/classroom discussion

 

Assesment tools: Homeworks, two midterm exams, final exam.

 

Instruction Language: English

 

EC 223 INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS

 

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 2

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3

 

Objective: This is an intermediate course in microeconomic analysis. The aim of the course is to extend the microeconomic principles developed in “Introduction to Economics I/II”. The course deals with positive and normative problems. It aims to include modern developments without being overly mathematical. To the extent time permits, topics from the various areas of applied microeconomics are discussed.

 

Prerequisite by topic: Basic principles of microeconomics, basic notions of calculus

Contents:  Market economy; markets and prices, Demand and Supply; elasticities of demand and supply, Consumer choice; individual and market demand, Production process; short run costs and output decisions, long run versus short run cost curves, Input demand; General equilibrium and welfare economics, Market imperfection; monopoly, monopolistic competition and oligopoly; Externalities; public goods; Imperfect information.

 

Recommended Reading :

  • Pindyck R.S, Rubinfeld D.L (2001). Microeconomics Fifth edition, Prentice Hall International Inc.
  • Varian H., (1992). Intermediate Microeconomics – A Modern Approach Third Edition, Norton.
  • Nicholson W., (1995). Microeconomic Theory – Basic Principles and Extensions, Sixth edition, The Dryden Press.

 

Teaching Methods:

  • Written Work: Students will be expected to write one essay and present a number of brief class reports.

 

Assessment tools: Written work, midterm exam, final exam

 

Instruction Language: English

 

EL 201 ENGLISH III

 

Type of Course: Lecture and Workshop

Year: 2

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3

Objective
:

 

To increase students’s efficiency in their academic work by teaching the necessary skills required for successful academic study.

 

To develop students proficiency in spoken English and equipping them with the specific terminology of their chosen field of study.

 

Contents:

Students to acquire and develop skills in the following areas.

Writing

Reading

Communication

Study Skills

 

Recommended Reading :

  • A wide range of daily newspapers;
  • Periodicals, eg: The Economist;
  • Newsweek; Time.
  • Student’s own course book.
  • Weekly prepared materials on current issues.
  • A Thesaurus.

 

Teaching Methods:

  • Lecture , Workshops, Seminairs, Interactive Student activities, Debates/Discussions on current issues
  • Presentation/Oral Practice Student projects and research.

 

Assessment tools:

Two mid term examinations, one final examination end of term Oral Assessment Continuous Assessment for coursework and participation.

 

Instruction Language:

English

 

TD 101 / TURKISH LANGUAGE I

 

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 2

Semester: Fall

Credits: 2

 

Objective

To provide students an understanding of Turkish grammar, writing rules, discussion of various types of literature, types of conversation and exposition, errors in conversation, intonation, academic and literal studies through gestures and facial expressions, rules of exposition in writing,  petition writing and official correspondence.

 

Content

This course covers the following subjects: The importance of language, the linguistic features and aesthetic structure of the Turkish language, word derivation system and affixation, oral and written expression, the rules of utterance in written and spoken language, word forms, language expressions such as idioms, terms, jargon, etc. and rules related to them, including language skills in listening, reading, comprehension, writing and research.

 

Recommended Reading

Course notes,Yusuf Çotuksöken, Uygulamalı Türk Dili 1-2.

Teaching Methods

Lecturing, analysis, applied courses -Socrates method-, discussion, homework and project-presentation.

 

Assessment tools

Attendance, participation to discussions, presentations, student writings, blackboard, projects, midterm exams, final exam.

 

Instruction Language

Turkish.

 

 

EC 224 INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS

 

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 2

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3

 

Objective: To help the student grasp more sophisticated and deeper subjects of old and modern macroeconomics. This course provides expertise in the field of Keynesian, Post-Keynesian and Neoclassical macroeconomics and in the school of Rational Expectations . The students have the opportunity of clearly differentiating among various school of thoughts.

Prerequisite by Topic: Introductory knowledge in economics.

Contents: Recapitulation of the Keynesian Income determination model: the expenditures approach, the leakages and injections approach; The aggregate demand and supply approach; Expectations; Inflation, Unemployment, The Phillips Curve; Monetary and Fiscal Policies; Growth.

 

Recommended Reading :

  • Olivier Blanchard (1997). Macroeconomics, Prentice Hall, New Jersey .

 

  • N. Gregory Mankiw (2002). Macroeconomics, 5th Edition, Worth Publishing , USA .

Teaching Methods: Lecture/classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Quizzes, Midterm exam, Final exam

Instruction Language: English

 

 

BA 216 BUSINESS LAW


Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 2

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3

 

Objective: The broad objective of this course is to enable students to respond sensibly to the impact of law on daily life. In addition, this course aims to enhance knowledge and understanding of law and society, learn the meanings of common legal terms, locate and cite legal information, and develop an understanding of the fundamentals of Turkish Law.

 

Prerequisite: None

 

Contents: What is law; the Development of law; the Categories of law; How laws are made; the Court system, Criminal Law; Family Law; Environmental Law; International Law.

 

Recommended Reading :

Demircioğlu-Centel (2003). İş Hukuku Beta Yayıncılık, İstanbul. 
Ali Güzel, Ali Rıza Okur (1998). Güvenlik Hukuku, Beta, İstanbul. 
Yusuf Alper (2000). Türkiyede Sosyal Güvenlik, Alfa, Bursa .

Teaching Methods: Classroom Discussion

 

Assessment tools: Two Midterms, Participation and Final exam.

 

Instruction Language: Turkish

 

 

IF 202 INTRODUCTION TO FINANCE

 

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 2

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3

Objective And Contents:
The main objective of this course is to teach students the fundemantal concepts of finance such as financial analysis, managerial finance, financial derivates and investment appraisal. Students will introduce with the basic concepts of finance. Also, financial institutions and markets, financial instruments, stock shares, futures, options, swaps, financial statements and the time value of money will be discussed in the class.


Recommended Reading :

Scott Besley and Eugene F. Brigham (2000). Essentials of Managerial Finance, twelfth edition., The Dryden Cudi Tuncer Gürsoy, Finansal Yönetim İlkeleri (2007), Doğuş Üniversitesi Yayınları.

Jae K. Shim, Joel G. Siegel, Financial Management (1998), Schaum?s Outlines, MacGraw Hill


Teaching Methods: Lecture/classroom discussion

Assessment Tools:
Quizzes, midterm exam, final exam

Instruction Language:
English

 

EL 202 ENGLISH IV

 

Type of Course: Lecture and Workshop

Year: 2

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3

Objective
:

 

To increase students’s efficiency in their academic work by teaching the necessary skills required for successful academic study.

 

To develop students proficiency in spoken English and equipping them with the specific terminology of their chosen field of study.

 

Contents:

Students to acquire and develop skills in the following areas.

Writing

Reading

Communication

Study Skills

 

Recommended Reading :

  • A wide range of daily newspapers;
  • Periodicals, eg: The Economist;
  • Newsweek; Time.
  • Student’s own course book.
  • Weekly prepared materials on current issues.
  • A Thesaurus.

 

Teaching Methods:

  • Lecture , Workshops, Seminairs, Interactive Student activities, Debates/Discussions on current issues
  • Presentation/Oral Practice Student projects and research.

 

Assessment tools:

Two mid term examinations, one final examination end of term Oral Assessment Continuous Assessment for coursework and participation.

 

Instruction Language:

English

 

TD 201 / TURKISH LANGUAGE II

 

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 2

Semester: Spring

Credits: 2

 

Objective

To provide students an understanding of Turkish grammar, writing rules, discussion of various types of literature, types of conversation and exposition, errors in conversation, intonation, academic and literal studies through gestures and facial expressions, rules of exposition in writing,  petition writing and official correspondence.

 

Content

This course covers the following subjects: The importance of language, the linguistic features and aesthetic structure of the Turkish language, word derivation system and affixation, oral and written expression, the rules of utterance in written and spoken language, word forms, language expressions such as idioms, terms, jargon, etc. and rules related to them, including language skills in listening, reading, comprehension, writing and research.

 

Recommended Reading

Course notes,Yusuf Çotuksöken, Uygulamalı Türk Dili 1-2.

Teaching Methods

Lecturing, analysis, applied courses -Socrates method-, discussion, homework and project-presentation.

 

Assessment tools

Attendance, participation to discussions, presentations, student writings, blackboard, projects, midterm exams, final exam.

 

Instruction Language

Turkish.

 

EC 323 ECONOMETRICS I

 

Type of Course: Lecture 
Year: 3
Semester: Fall 
Credits: 3

Objective And Contents:
The course aims to present and illustrate the techniques of empirical investigation in economics. Applications and practical issues will be emphasized throughout the course. The Classical Simple and Multiple Linear Regression Model-Estimation; Single-Equation Regression Models; The Nature of Regression Analysis, Two-Variable Regression Analysis: Some Basic Ideas, Two-Variable Regression Model: The Problem of Estimation, Classical Normal Linear Regression Model (CNLRM), Two-Variable Regression: Estimation and Hypothesis Testing, Extensions of the Two-Variable Linear Regression Model, Multiple Regression Analysis: The Problem of Estimation, Multiple Regression Analysis: The Problem of Inference, Dummy Variable Regression Models, Relaxing the Assumptions of the Classical Model; Multicollinearity: What Happens if the Regressors Are Correlated, Heteroscedasticity: What Happens if the Error Variance Is Nonconstant' Autocorrelation: What Happens if the Error Terms Are Correlated, Econometric Modeling: Model Specification and Diagnostic Testing, 

Prerequisite by Topic: Basic knowledge of calculus and statistics

Recommended Reading:
Wooldridge J.,(2000). Introductory Econometrics, South Western College Publishing.
Gujarati, D.N., (1999). Basic Econometrics, McGraw-Hill.

Teaching Methods:

Class Work: Exercises are provided and discussed in the class. Students are required to hand in written answers to the exercises for correction. 

Assessment Tools:
Homework, research project, midterm exam, final exam

Instruction Language:
English

 

EC 321 PUBLIC FINANCE

 

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 3

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3

Objective And Contents:
To give students an insight into the mechanism of public sector decision making process along with the governmental allocation intervention and fiscal institutions such as economic analysis of public expenditures, revenues and borrowings. Resource scarcity calling for governmental inter sector allocation; The theory of public goods and reasons for governmental intervention with specific reference to state economic enterprises; Public choice in a democracy; Economic analysis of public budgeting and fiscal principles to be applied to taxation.


Prerequisite by Topic: Basic principles of micro and macro economics

Recommended Reading :
B. P. Herber, (1983). Modern Public Finance , 5th ed., Irwin , Illinois .
O. Şener, (2001). Public Economics, 7th ed., Beta, İstanbul.

Teaching Methods:
Lectures + Projects

Assessment Tools:
Homework, presentation of projects, midterm exam, final exam

Instruction Language:
English

 

EC 327 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

 

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 3

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3

Objective And Contents: This course seeks to examine and discuss contemporary features of international economic relations. It aims to place these within a broader historical as well as theoretical context. It adopts a mixture of ‘political economy’ framework and a standard ‘mainstream’ often also called ‘neo-classical’ approach to the study of international economics. The course aims to develop an analysis and a deeper understanding of the the causes and consequences of international trade, motives and gains from trade, instruments of trade policy and to asses the effects of international trade. The course locates these analysis and trade policy on the welfare of an open economy. Gains from Trade, Adam Smith and Free Trade, Absolute Advantage, Ricardian Comparative Advantage, Specific Factors Model, Hecscher-Ohlin Model, Standard Trade Model, External and Internal Economies of Scale in International Trade, instruments of trade policy, balance of payments.


Prerequisite by Topic: Basic microeconomics and macroeconomics

Recommended Reading:
Dunn and Mutti (2000), International Economics, 5th Edition, London:Routledge
Paul Krugman and Obstfeld Maurice (2003), 6th Edition, International Economics, New York: HarperCollins Publishers

Additional Readings include:

Kenen P (2000), The International Economy, 4th Edition, Cambridge: CUP
Yarbrough, B and Yarbrough R (2000), The World Economy, Trade and Finance, 5th Edition, London: Harcourt
Halil Seyidoglu (1993), Uluslararası Iktisat, Güzem Yay., İstanbul

Teaching Method:
Lectures
Tutorials

Assesment Tools:

Class presentation 10%
2000 word written essay 20%
Final Examination 70%

Instruction Language:
English

 

 

IF 311 MONETARY AND FINANCIAL ECONOMICS

 

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 3

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3

Objective And Contents:
To give the students of economics, business and finance deeper insights on monetary and banking theory; This course also aims at presenting the Classic, Keynesian, Monetarist and modern approaches in the theory of money and banking. The monetary theory: definition and kinds of money, the functions of money; The demand for money, monetary market, interest rates; Simultaneous equilibrium in the goods and monetary markets: the IS-LM approach; The theory of banking: banking firm and industry, banking operations, how do the banks create money; Types of banks: Central banking, commercial banking, investment and development banking.

Recommended Reading :

Frederic S. Mishkin (2001). The Economics of Money, Banking and Financial Markets, 6th edition, Addison Wesley, Boston .
Lawrence S. Ritter, William L. Silber and Gregory F. Udell (1999). Principles of Money, Banking, and Financial Markets, 10th Edition, Pearson Addison Wesley.

Teaching Methods: Lecture/classroom discussions

Assessment Tools:
Quizzes, midterm exam, final exam

Instruction Language:
English

 

EC 324 ECONOMETRICS II

 

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 3

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3

Objective And Contents:
The aim of the course is to extend econometric techniques developed in “Econometrics I (EC 323)”. The lectures are concerned with practical econometrics and cover the use of standard computer packages in econometrics including practical exercises. Nonlinear Regression Models, Qualitative Response Regression Model, Panel Data Regression Model, Dynamic Econometric Models: Autoregressive and Distributed-Lag Models, Simultaneous-Equation Models: Simultaneous-Equation Models, The Identification Problem, Simultaneous-Equation Methods, Time Series Econometrics: Unit-root and Cointegration (Testing and Application ), Forecasting.


Prerequisite by Topic: Knowledge of elementary econometrics, calculus, linear algebra and statistics.

Recommended Reading :
Wooldridge J.,(2000). Introductory Econometrics, South Western College Publishing.
Gujarati, D.N., (1999). Basic Econometrics, McGraw-Hill.

Teaching Methods:

Class Work: Exercises are provided and discussed in the class. Students are required to hand in written answers to the exercises for correction.

Assessment Tools:
Homework, research project, midterm exam, final exam

Instruction Language:
English

 

EC 328 INTERNATIONAL MONETARY ECONOMICS

 

Type of Course: Lecture
Year: 3
Semester: Spring
Credits: 3

Objective And Contents:
The course introduces modern theories of monetary and fiscal policy. This is done in connection with the basic facts about the international economic and financial developments. The course also focuses on the workings of the international money and capital markets and a variety of foreign exchange regimes. The course extends its objective to include a discussion about the dominant models of international economic sphere that dominates the workings of privately owned institutions. A particular emphasis is also put on the methods of portfolio diversification, derivatives markets, causes and consequences of financial innovations. National income accounting and balance of payments, foreign exchange market and exchange rate determination, macroeconomic policy in the open economy, derivatives and modern theories of portfolio diversification. 
Prerequisite by Topic: Basic principles of macroeconomics.

Recommended Reading:
Keith Pilbeam (2005), International Finance, London: MacMillan
Dunn and Mutti (2000), International Economics, 5th Edition, London:Routledge
Paul Krugman and Obstfeld Maurice (2003), International Economics, New York: HarperCollins Publishers

Additional Readings include:

Aybar and Lapavitsas (2000), “Neither Washington Nor-Post Washington Consensus”, London: Routledge
Kenen P (2000), The International Economy, 4th Edition, Cambridge: CUP
Yarbrough, B and Yarbrough R (2000), The World Economy, Trade and Finance, 5th Edition, London: Harcourt
Halil Seyidoglu (1993), Uluslararası İktisat, Güzem Yay., Istanbul

Teaching Method:
Lectures
Tutorials

Assesment Tools:

Class presentation 10%
2000 words essay 20%
Unseen written exam 70%

Instruction Language:
English

 

BA 302 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS AND ETHICS

 

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 3

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3

Objective And Contents:
Effective communication is an essential skill in business. As you move up the ladder of success, communication skills become even more necessary and valuable. This course will give you the opportunity to develop skills that will be useful as you climb that ladder. Individuals must be able to communicate their ideas in both written and oral modes. We aim to introduce students the fundamentals of Business Communication by focusing on verbal and nonverbal business communication skills. Introduction to Business Communication; We will start with the eight parts of the speech. We will focus on business grammar, business vocabulary, business English speaking & listening skills, resume writing, business letter writing, business meeting and reading skills, managerial / business ethics and corporate social responsibility.

Recommended Reading :

Business Communication English: Facing Today’s Business Communication Challenges Lesson Notes by Vedat AKMAN, 2006 (102 pages) – Kadir Has University.

Teaching Methods:
Students will follow instructor’s notes, handouts & notes plus visual + listening aids & slides will be used.

Assessment Tools:
Midterm exam, Final exam

Instruction Language:
English

 

EC 332 INDUSTRIAL ECONOMICS

 

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 3

Semester: Spring

Credits:

Objective And Contents:
The aim of the course is to understand the structure, conduct and performance of firms by studying analytical models of imperfect competition and strategic behavior among firms. The material covered also includes the applications in the area of competition policy. The theory of the firm; monopoly power, product selection, quality and advertising, price discrimination, Strategic interaction; short-run price competition, product differentiation; Introduction to game theory; non-cooperative game theory; Antitrust laws and policy, Regulation and deregulation.

Prerequisite by Topic:
A strong background in intermediate level microeconomic theory

Recommended Reading :

L.M.B. Cabral (2000). Introduction to Industrial Organization, MIT press, USA 
J. Tirole (1988). The Theory of Industrial Organization, MIT press, USA 

Teaching Methods:

Team work
Classroom discussion


Assessment Tools: Homework, two midterm, final exam 

Instruction Language: English

 

EC 421 ECONOMICS OF GROWTH

 

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 4

Semester: Fall

Credits:

Objective And Contents:
The aim of the course is to examine the determinants of long-term growth. The emphasis is on the recent developments in economic theory which has fundamentally changed the understanding of macro economic fluctuations and related issues. Stylized facts of growth; Growth accounting and convergence; Balanced growth; Solow model (with and without exogenous technical change); Solow model (with and without exogenous technical change); Endogenous growth; Real business cycles 
Prerequisite by Topic: Intermediate level microeconomics and macroeconomics, differential equations, basic notions of econometrics.

Recommended Reading :
R. Barro and X. Sala-i Martin (1995). Growth Economics, Mc Graw-Hill/Irwin , New York .

Teaching Methods:

Written work: Students will write at least two essays on topics notified at the beginning of the term.

Assessment Tools:
Essays, midterm exam, final exam.

Instruction Language:
English

 

EC 433 TURKISH ECONOMY

 

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 4

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3

Objective And Contents:
The course will concentrate on economic policy issues in Turkey and relevant analytical tools. Dynamics of change in the Turkish economy within the context of globalization is emphasized. Study of Ottoman and Turkish economic and social history; Developments in the Turkish economy; early period (1923 – 1945), 1946-1960 period, 1960-1980 period, structural adjustment program in 1980, economic crisis: 1994; 2000-2001; Developments in various sectors of the Turkish economy; International economic relations.
Prerequisite by Topic: Intermediate level micro and macroeconomic theory. 

Recommended Reading :
M.Hiç (1998). Turkish Economy, İstanbul Basın Yayın, İstanbul

Teaching Methods:

Classroom discussion: Class dicussion on topics that are generally complementary to the lecture syllabus.

Assessment Tools:
Homework, midterm exam, final exam 

Instruction Language:
English

 

EC 425 APPLIED ECONOMICS

 

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 4

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3

Objective And Contents:
The course consists of diverse topics in applied microeconomics and macroeconomics and aims to combine up-to-date information with theory to provide introduction to real world economics. The Microeconomic Topics; Firms decision of prices, small-scaled firms, growth of firms, oligopoly, privatization, multinational firms, economics of environment, social policy: health and education, regional policy, agriculture, The Macroeconomic Topics; Spending and saving, investment, public expenditure, money-inflation-unemployment, international trade, developing countries.

Prerequisite by Topic: Intermediate level micro and macroeconomic theory, basic methods of econometrics.

Recommended Reading :

A. Griffiths and S. Mill ( 2000), Applied Economics, 9th ed., Pearson Education.

Teaching Methods:

Written work : Students will write at least two essays on topics notified at the beginning of the term.

Assesment Tools:
Essays, midterm exam, final exam.

Instruction Language:
English

 

 

EC 432 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT

 

Type of Course:

Year: 4

Semester: Spring

Credits:

Objective And Contents:
This course is primarily concerned with a wide range of schools of economic thought. The course covers historical development of the various types of economic thinking and links these to the issues like trade, agriculture, industrial development and policies for industrialisation, the role of the state in development, structural adjustment, labor market and female labor participation. The course aims to concentrate on the contributions of famous economists on the theory of economic thoughts and their effects on the economists are studied. The principle target of the course is to uncover the dyanmics that dominate the change in economic thinking. 
The course starts by focusing on the economic views of the ancient thinkers including Chanakya (c 350 – 275) the Indian Machiavelli, Aristotle and Plato then moves onto cover Classical Economists. The main emphasis is given to Adam Smith, Malthus, Ricardo and Marx. The works of these are contrasted with each other and that of Mercantilists and Physiocrats. The course then moves on to more modern versions of studies in the discipline of economics. Austrian School of thought, Walras, Jevons and Menger’s work are studied and Marshallian revolution is touched upon. The course refers to Keynesian and Post-Keynesian approaches as well as neo-Marxists and neo-classicals.


Prerequisite by Topic: All courses that are relevant to the discipline of economics. 

Recommended Reading :
G. Grossman (1974). Economic Systems, Sec.ed., Prentice Hall, New Jersey 
O. Şener (2003). Famous Economists, Sec.ed, Bahar, İstanbul
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_economic_thought
http://cepa.newschool.edu/het/

Teaching Methods:

Lectures,
Tutorials, 
2000 words essay.

Assesment Tools:

Class presentations 10%,
Written Assignment 20%,
Unseen essay type exam 70%.

Instruction Language:
English

 

EC 434 POLITICAL ECONOMY OF DEVELOPMENT

 

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 4

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3

Objective And Contents:
Economic policy issues in Turkey and relevant analytical tools. Dynamics of change in the Turkish economy within the context of globalization is emphasized. Study of Ottoman and Turkish economic and social history; Developments in the Turkish economy; early period (1923 – 1945), 1946-1960 period, 1960-1980 period, structural adjustment program in 1980, economic crisis: 1994; 2000-2001; Developments in various sectors of the Turkish economy; International economic relations.
Prerequisite by Topic: Intermediate level micro and macroeconomic theory. 

Recommended Reading :
M.Hiç (1998). Turkish Economy, İstanbul Basın Yayın, İstanbul

Teaching Methods:

Classroom discussion: Class dicussion on topics that are generally complementary to the lecture syllabus.

Assessment Tools:
Homework, midterm exam, final exam 

Instruction Language:
English

 

EC 490 RESEARCH METHODS AND GRADUATION PROJECT

 

Type of Course: Research, Reading and Writing

Year: 4

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3

 

Objective: The course is based on research, reading & writing about a topic of the students’ choice (This topic should be approved by the supervisors). The aim is to enable students to conduct research, culminate it in a written work and present the theme facing a jury formed by the faculty members.

 

Prerequisite by Topic: None

Contents:  Students are%